Privacy Law Blog

Tag Archives: surveillance

Cal. Supreme Court Has a Look at Cameras in the Workplace

In Hernandez v. Hillsides, Inc., S147552 (Aug. 3, 2009), the California Supreme Court unanimously held that the mere placement of a hidden video camera in an employee's office could constitute an invasion of privacy, even if the camera was never actually used to record the employee. Under the specific facts of the case, however, the Court ultimately found no liability because the intrusion was relatively minor, limited and justified, but California employers should be aware that the use of hidden surveillance cameras without notice or warning in "semi-private" office space is likely to produce an actionable claim for invasion of privacy in many cases. … Continue Reading

Privacy under the 44th President? Will the New Administration Bring a New Playbook?

  As we prepare to welcome both the 44th President and a revamped Congress to Washington, it is time to consider what privacy under the new administration will look like. Barack Obama polled strongly on the campaign trail as the candidate most likely to advance individual privacy rights, but are the pollsters a good indicator what … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Upholds NLRB Test for Unlawful Employer Surveillance of Union Activities

In a unanimous panel opinion issued on January 28, 2008, the Ninth Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) newly-announced three-factor test for determining whether employer surveillance activity of potential union members is coercive and therefore in violation of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The case, Local Joint Executive Board of Las Vegas et … Continue Reading
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