Privacy Law Blog

FTC Seeks to Move Beyond Notice and Consent to Restrict Data Collection and Use

The FTC indicated that it will use its rulemaking authority under the FTC Act’s Section 18 to create a new rule that will likely seek to rein in broad data collection and use.

In October 2021, FTC Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter made two speeches in which she expressed a desire to move beyond the FTC’s “notice-and-consent” framework to address broader surveillance practices that underlie the digital advertising economy, specifically by applying “bright-line purpose and use restrictions that minimize the data that can be collected and how it can be deployed.”

Continue Reading

“Log4Shell” Vulnerability Has Potential to Compromise Millions of Devices

Cybersecurity experts around the world are scrambling to sound the alarm about a newly discovered security vulnerability that could be used by attackers to easily infiltrate computer systems. Continue Reading

UK Supreme Court Landmark Decision Limits Data Privacy Class Actions in the UK

The UK Supreme Court handed down its much-anticipated decision in the Lloyd v Google LLC [2021] UKSC 50 case on 10 November 2021 restricting claimants’ ability to bring data privacy class actions in the UK under the (now repealed) Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA 1998). This decision will be persuasive (though not binding) with respect to similar class actions brought under the (in-force) UK General Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Act 2018 (collectively, the UK GDPR). This decision will not directly impact litigation brought under the EU General Data Protection Regulation in EU member states. Continue Reading

Litigation Update on Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act

Earlier this year, we reported on the potential breeding ground for litigation under Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”).  A recent decision from an Illinois state appellate panel on the different limitations periods that apply to BIPA provides guidance for companies faced with a BIPA lawsuit and the arguments they can make on a motion to dismiss.

Read the full post on Proskauer’s Minding Your Business blog.

English High Court Clarifies Appropriate Causes of Action in Data Claim Where Defendant Was a Victim of Third-Party Cyber-Attack

In the recent and significant Warren v DSG Retail Ltd [2021] EWHC 2168 (QB) decision the High Court in England clarified the limited circumstances in which claims for breach of confidence, misuse of private information and the tort of negligence might be advanced by individuals for compensation for distress relating to a cyber-security breach where the proposed defendant was itself a victim of a third-party cyber-attack. The decision has made it harder to bring free standing/non-statutory cyber-security breach claims in England and Wales where the proposed defendant has not positively caused the breach, and has also brought into question how such claims may be funded going forward (particularly, via “After-the-Event insurance” (“ATE insurance”)).

Continue Reading

INDEPTH: Data Protection & Privacy Laws 2021

A heightened risk for cyberattacks and data breaches calls for companies to remain diligent as they navigate a patchwork of federal, state, local and sector-specific privacy and data protection laws, regulations and guidance. For Financier Worldwide, Margaret A. Dale and Ryan P. Blaney deliver commentary on the evolving landscape and offer considerations for companies looking to enhance their controls and risk management processes.

Read the Q&A here.

Navigating the New Standard Contractual Clauses for International Data Transfers under the GDPR

The final version of the new standard contractual clauses (“SCCs”) were published by the European Commission on June 4, 2021. Many organizations that transfer or receive personal data originating in the European Economic Area (“EEA”) outside the EEA will be required to implement these SCCs with their customers, suppliers and affiliates by December 2022 to comply with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”). This is perhaps the most significant GDPR development since the passage of the GDPR. We had foreshadowed this impending development last week. Continue Reading

LexBlog

This website uses third party cookies, over which we have no control. To deactivate the use of third party advertising cookies, you should alter the settings in your browser.

OK