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Tag Archives: attorney general

Veto, Veto, Pass! New Governor Means New Breach Notification Law in California

On Wednesday, August 31, 2011, California became the third state this year to amend its existing security breach notification law when Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Senate Bill 24 ("SB 24"). SB 24's specific changes, while far from sweeping, include the addition of content requirements for notice letters to individuals and a requirement to send a sample letter to the state's attorney general if more than 500 people are affected by a breach. SB 24 won't add much to most nationwide breach response plans, but will up the ante for those doing business primarily (or exclusively) in California. … Continue Reading

You, NOT the Newspapers, Should Report a Breach: WellPoint to Pay $100,000 to Indiana AG for Delayed Breach Notification

On July 5, 2011, Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller announced a settlement with health insurer WellPoint, Inc. The settlement resolves allegations that the company failed to promptly notify the Attorney General's office of a data breach as is required by the Indiana Disclosure of Security Breach Act. As part of the settlement, WellPoint must pay a fine of $100,000, provide certain identity-theft-prevention assistance to consumers affected by the breach, and admit that it failed to comply with the law by not notifying Zoeller's office "without unreasonable delay." … Continue Reading

Glacially Expedient? Vermont Attorney General Settles with HealthNet for Failure to Timely Notify State Residents of Data Breach

On January 18, 2011, Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell announced a settlement with HealthNet, Inc. and Health Net of the Northeast, Inc. over allegations that the company violated the state's data breach notification law when the company waited over six months to notify state residents of the loss of a portable hard drive that contained their unencrypted personal information. The Attorney General's settlement is an important reminder that the unpleasantness of a security breach is only compounded by a poor response. If you have not already done so, the time for establishing a comprehensive breach response plan is now! … Continue Reading

Show-Me State Finally Shows Its Residents a Data Breach Notification Law, Other States (TX, NC, ME) Make Changes

Missouri: HB 62 includes many provisions that are similar to other state laws requiring notice to individuals when the security of their personal information has been compromised. For example, HB 62 includes a "material risk of harm" trigger. In other words, a business is not required to notify Missouri residents if, after an appropriate investigation or consultation with relevant law enforcement authorities, the business determines that identity theft is not likely to result from the breach. In addition, a business is not required to notify state residents if the personal information compromised was encrypted. Like some other state laws, HB 62 also requires notice to the Missouri Attorney General and national consumer reporting agencies if more than 1,000 Missouri residents are notified, and allows the Attorney General to seek actual damages or civil penalties from persons that fail to comply with the law. … Continue Reading
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