Privacy Law Blog

Tag Archives: privacy

Please Ignore the Intrusion, We Just Have a Few Questions to Ask: Supreme Court Validates Background Checks for Government Contractors

On January 19, 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the federal government has broad latitude to conduct background checks on contractors who work at government facilities. Assuming, without deciding, that two parts of a standard government employment background investigation implicated a constitutional privacy interest, the Court held that the government is permitted to ask reasonable employment-related questions that further the government's interests in managing its internal operations, particularly where the results of such investigations are adequately protected from public disclosure. … Continue Reading

Massachusetts Data Security Regulations: Your Company May Not Be Located There, But If Your Customers Are, You Need to Comply

As we’ve discussed in prior posts, newly effective regulations promulgated under Massachusetts’ recent data security law, Mass. Gen. Law ch. 93H, have raised the bar for data security compliance, and they have a long reach.  The regulations are national and international in scope, as they apply to all companies – wherever located– using personal data … Continue Reading

Flash Cookies — Back on the Radar

  When Flash cookies (also known as a “Local Shared Objects”) were first flagged as a privacy issue back in 2005, a few savvy companies added a disclosure about Flash cookies into their web site privacy policies. Since then, we have not heard the issue raised again. Now this sleeper issue seems to have been awakened by … Continue Reading

European Privacy Law And Social Networking

  With social networking sites proliferating across international boundaries, privacy and data protection concerns are becoming increasingly relevant. With these concerns in mind, the Article 29 Working Party, an independent European advisory body on data protection and privacy, adopted an opinion on online social networking on June 12, 2009. As noted by the Working Party, the … Continue Reading

Consumer Advocacy Groups Request Federal Trade Commission Action To Stop Perceived “Threat” From Mobile Marketing

In a year when behavioral advertising was already expected to be at the top of the hot button privacy issues list, on January 13, 2008, the Center for Digital Democracy (“CDT”) and U.S. Public Interest Research Group (“US PIRG”) filed a document with the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) urging the FTC to investigate online mobile … Continue Reading

Department of Education Issues Final Regulations Amending FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) (“FERPA”) imposes various requirements on educational institutions regarding the privacy of personally identifiable information contained in education records of students.  On December 9, 2008, the U.S. Department of Education (“DOE”) published final rules amending the regulations that implement FERPA.      … Continue Reading

Zip Codes not “Personal Identification Information” under California’s Song-Beverly Act

On December 19, 2008, in Party City Corp. v. The Superior Court of San Diego County, the California Court of Appeal in the Fourth Appellate District held that zip codes are not “personal identification information” under California’s Song-Beverly Credit Card Act of 1971, California Civil Code Sec. 1747.08 (the “Act.”). The Act prohibits a retailer … Continue Reading

Privacy under the 44th President? Will the New Administration Bring a New Playbook?

  As we prepare to welcome both the 44th President and a revamped Congress to Washington, it is time to consider what privacy under the new administration will look like. Barack Obama polled strongly on the campaign trail as the candidate most likely to advance individual privacy rights, but are the pollsters a good indicator what … Continue Reading

FTC Staff Issues Proposed Self Regulatory Principles for Behavioral Advertising and Seeks Comment

FTC staff issued a statement today proposing four “self-regulatory” principles to guide businesses engaged in online behavioral advertising. FTC staff also seeks public comments on these principles as well as additional information on what other uses businesses are making of online tracking data. Interested parties can submit comments by February 22, 2008. The statement, titled “Online Behavioral … Continue Reading

Social Networking Sites Feel The Heat From Law Enforcement

Kids like social networking sites, most notably MySpace and Facebook. So it is not surpising that law enforcement is scrutinizing how the sites protect children. Recent subpoenas issued to Facebook by New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo and New Jersey Attorney General Anne Milgram are illustrative. Both subpoenas sought information about Facebook’s Internet safety and security policies. The … Continue Reading

International Privacy Issues and More Addressed in New International Practice Guide

Proskauer Rose LLP has just released "Proskauer on International Litigation and Arbitration: Managing, Resolving, and Avoiding Cross-Border Business and Regulatory Disputes." The online guide is a practical reference work for businesses and practitioners; it explores best practices and creative yet practical approaches to manage, resolve, and avoid controversies affecting multiple jurisdictions. The 28-chapter guide is available free in e-Book format at www.proskauerguide.com. It includes a thorough chapter on international privacy law. … Continue Reading

The Sixth Circuit Affirms Individual Expectation of Privacy in Emails

In a decision that will significantly impact the ability of the government to access electronic communications, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit on June 18, 2007, affirmed a district court’s issuance of a preliminary injunction prohibiting governmental entities from obtaining Internet Service Providers’ (“ISP”) subscribers’ e-mail communications unless the subscriber first … Continue Reading

In Response To TJX Data Breach, One State Enacts Legislation Imposing New Security and Liability Obligations; Similar Bills Pending in Five Other States

Lawmakers in six states have responded quickly to the massive data breach at TJX Companies, Inc. with various bills designed to strengthen merchant security and/or render companies liable for third party companies’ costs arising from data breaches. These latest bills – introduced in California, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota and Texas – represent a new front of … Continue Reading

Proposed California Legislation Would Require Retailers to Dispose of Personal Information Within 90 Days

Under legislation recently proposed in California, retailers doing business in the state would be subject to enhanced data destruction requirements, and all businesses would be affected by new data breach notification requirements.  In the wake of the TJX Companies data breach, which may have affected more than 46.2 million credit and debit cards, California Assemblyman … Continue Reading

Expectation of Privacy in Student Computer Persists in the Absence of Announced Monitoring Policy

Last week, a panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that in the absence of an announced monitoring policy, the mere act of connecting a computer to a network does not extinguish a user’s reasonable expectation of privacy, under the Fourth Amendment, in the contents of his or her computer. The panel announced its … Continue Reading

Welcome

Welcome to the Proskauer Privacy Law Blog. Proskauer’s Privacy and Data Security Practice Group is tremendously pleased to bring you what we hope will become a trusted source for summary and analysis of breaking legal developments in the evolving field of privacy and data security law. This blog is designed in part to complement our … Continue Reading
LexBlog