Privacy Law Blog

Tag Archives: France

New Privacy Developments in France

DataGuidance spoke with Cécile Martin, Special International Counsel at Proskauer Rose LLP, at the International Association of Privacy Professionals’ Conference in Brussels in November 2016. Cécile discussed the passing of the Digital Republic Bill and its implications for organizations, as well as the latest developments regarding employee monitoring in France and the upcoming changes with … Continue Reading

French Data Protection Wants to Force Google to Extend the Right To Be Delisted to All the Search Engine’s Extensions

Co-authored by Geoffrey Roche   On March 10, 2016, the French data protection agency (« CNIL ») pronounced a €100.000 ($111,715) fine against Google Inc. for failure to comply with its formal injunction of May, 2015 ordering the company to extend delisting to all the search engine’s extensions.… Continue Reading

France Facilitates Implementation of Whistleblowing Systems

In France, before implementing a whistleblowing process, a company must inform and consult with its employees’ representatives, inform its employees and notify the French Data Protection Agency (CNIL). There are two possible ways to notify the CNIL of a whistleblowing system: request a formal authorization from the CNIL (this is quite burdensome and difficult to … Continue Reading

CNIL Cracks Down on Employee Video Monitoring and Password Strength

In a recent decision (deliberation CNIL May 30, 2013 n°2013-139), the French Data Protection Agency (CNIL) sanctioned a company for implementing a CCTV system without informing employees and because the CCTV enabled the constant monitoring of one employee making the recording disproportionate to the goal pursued.  The CNIL also sanctioned the company because it failed … Continue Reading

Navigating the Patchwork: When Is European Data Privacy Law Applicable to US Companies?

Are social media companies based in the United States subject to European data privacy laws?  Two recent judicial decisions – one in France and the other in Germany – arrived at different answers.  The Civil Court of Paris held that Twitter, based in California, was obligated under the French Code of Civil Procedure to reveal … Continue Reading

French employees should check their privacy settings before posting on social media platforms

It may seem obvious to a lay person that employees should refrain from insulting their companies on social media due to the threat of termination for cause; however, there are contradictory legal principles that apply to the use of social media by employees which can be used both for and against employees (i.e. freedom of speech, right to privacy, data protection laws, an employer's right to take disciplinary action, public insult offense, etc.) As a consequence, there is uncertainty as to whether an employer can use its employees' postings made on social media websites to sanction them. … Continue Reading

What’s new in Europe?

While the European Commission is seeking to update its 15-year-old Directive regarding the protection of personal data, several regulations have been passed to strengthen privacy rights in Europe. With all this activity, it's clear that the United States is not the only country trying to adapt its privacy and information security standards to rapidly evolving technologies and marketplaces. Companies with an international presence need to stay alert to stay compliant. We can help! … Continue Reading

French Data Protection Agency Restricts the Scope of the Whistleblowing Procedures: Multinational Companies Need to Make Sure They Are Compliant

By a decision dated October 14, 2010, and published on December 8, 2010, the French Data Protection Agency (known under the acronym CNIL) revised the deliberation that it issued on December 8, 2005. At that time, the CNIL had issued a deliberation to reach a compromise between the United States' Sarbanes-Oxley ("SOX") requirements and French law. According to Article 1 of that deliberation, companies were authorized to adopt whistleblowing systems implemented in response to French legislative mandates, regulatory internal control requirements (e.g. regulations governing banking institutions), or the whistleblowing requirements of the SOX Act. According to Article 3 of the 2005 deliberation, alleged wrongdoings not encompassed within these core areas may be covered by the whistleblowing system only if vital interests of the company or the physical or psychological integrity of its employees were threatened. … Continue Reading
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