Privacy Law Blog

Tag Archives: data breach litigation

CJEU holds that mass surveillance must not be general and indiscriminate

The CJEU (the European Union Court of Justice) has handed down a decision which makes clear that general and indiscriminate retention of electronic communications is unlawful. National legislation of each European Member State should ensure that mass surveillance only occurs where it is strictly necessary in order to combat serious crime as well as terrorism … Continue Reading

Shareholders Denied Suit Against Home Depot Over Data Breach

Judge Thomas W. Thrash Jr. of the U.S. District Court of Georgia permanently shelved a derivative suit brought by shareholders of Home Depot. Home Depot is a multinational home improvement retailer. In September, 2014, Home Depot suffered a data breach that resulted in $192 million in net losses. This breach followed the widely publicized data … Continue Reading

Attention Retailers: Target Data Breach Ruling Finds Duty Owed to Issuer Banks

The Court hearing the Target data security breach litigation issued a ruling on December 2, 2014, largely denying Target’s motion to dismiss the Consolidated Amended Class Action Complaint in the Financial Institutions Cases.  In his decision, Judge Magnuson found that Target owed the issuer banks a duty to protect customer data from hackers, a determination that … Continue Reading

Michaels Stores Still PINned beneath Payment Card Skimming Lawsuit

In May 2011, Michaels Stores reported that "skimmers" using modified PIN pad devices in eighty Michaels stores across twenty states had gained unauthorized access to customers' debit and credit card information. Lawsuits soon splattered on the specialty arts and crafts retailer, alleging a gallery of claims under the Stored Communications Act ("SCA"), the Illinois Consumer Fraud and Deceptive Business Practices Act ("ICFA"), and for negligence, negligence per se, and breach of implied contract. Late last month, U.S. District Court Judge Charles Kocoras dismissed some claims, but others survived. The opinion presents a broad-brush survey of potential data security breach claims, with some fine detail and local color particular to this variety of criminal data security breach. … Continue Reading

Judge Finds Injury-in-Fact Adequately Alleged in RockYou Data Breach Action

Where others have failed, Alan Claridge did not. Recently, a Federal judge in the Northern District of California declined to dismiss Plaintiff Claridge’s claims arising from a data breach involving the social entertainment site RockYou. Arguing that the data breach harmed the value of his personal information, Plaintiff convinced the court not to dismiss his action for … Continue Reading

Proskauer Litigators Notch Another Victory for The Bank of New York Mellon in “Identity Exposure” Lawsuit

On June 25, 2010, Judge Richard Berman of the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York granted summary judgment to The Bank of New York Mellon Corp. in Hammond v. The Bank of New York Mellon Corp., dismissing in its entirety a putative class action lawsuit arising from the loss of backup tapes containing personal information in the spring of 2008. Judge Berman's dismissal represents yet another in a long, and still growing, line of cases standing for the proposition that without more, the mere exposure of personal information is not an adequate basis for a lawsuit. … Continue Reading

Geez Ruiz: 9th Circuit (Probably) Ends Long-standing Data Breach Litigation Against Gap, Inc. and Others

On May 28, 2010, in an unpublished decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed the California district court's dismissal of a class action lawsuit against retailer Gap, Inc. because, among other things, the plaintiff failed to show that the loss of his personal information harmed him in a legally cognizable way. The Ninth Circuit's decision echoes those issued in every "identity exposure" lawsuit to date: an increased risk of identity theft does not a lawsuit make! … Continue Reading

Northern District of Illinois Foreshadows Tough Row[e] to Hoe for Identity Exposure Plaintiff, but Denies Motion to Dismiss

On January 5, 2010, Judge William Hibbler of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois became the latest federal district judge to share his views about whether an increased risk of future harm based on the inadvertent exposure of personal information is a legally cognizable harm. In Rowe v. UniCare Life & Health Insurance Co., No. 1:09-cv-2286 (N.D. Ill. Jan. 5, 2010), Judge Hibbler . . . hinted that the plaintiff's claims for violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act ("FCRA") and the Illinois Insurance Information and Privacy Act, as well as his common law claims of invasion of privacy, negligence and breach of implied contract, may ultimately be dismissed if the plaintiff failed to show a basis for damages other than his alleged increased risk of future harm, such as identity theft. … Continue Reading

Data Breach Class Action Fails – Court Dismisses Securities Fraud Case Against Heartland

On December 7, 2009, a federal district court sitting in New Jersey dismissed a securities fraud class action lawsuit against Heartland Payment Systems arising from a massive breach of credit and debit card information and, in doing so, reinforced the difficulties private plaintiffs face in bringing data breach lawsuits under the federal securities laws.… Continue Reading
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